5 Sewing Tips for April

5 Sewing Tips April

tip-1-copy

Have you ever sewn a long zip down the centre back of a dress, and it has turned out wavy? Say goodbye to this problem by applying fusetape to the stitching line first:

fusetape

The wavy appearance is caused by the fabric stretching as you sew (either because the fabric is stretchy, or the seam is a curved shape). Fusetape prevents the fabric stretching as you sew, and your finished zip will be perfect.

tip-2-copy

Still on the topic of zips – make life easy on yourself and insert your zip as early as possible in your garment assembly.

zip

It really is much easier to sew a CB zip into the back panels alone, than to try and sew it into a nearly completed skirt or dress. Otherwise you could end up like I did!

tip-3-copy

Taping a waistline is always a good idea to prevent it stretching during wear, but it can get a little bulky around the zip with all those layers.

tape

My secret is to trim 1cm (seam allowance width) off the length of the tape at each end, eliminating one layer of bulk in this area.  I have been known to trim 2cm (two seam allowances) to eliminate more bulk if I think it needs it.

tip-4-copy

I’m all for making things easier on yourself, so here’s another trick – when you are binding a sleeve placket, cut the binding on the straight grain and not the bias:

binding

Trust me, you’ll find it far easier to sew.  Save the bias idea for fabrics that call for it – such as checks or plaids.

tip-5-copy

April’s tutorial is all about how to hem an inverted pleat – it can be a bit tricky to get a neat finish in this area, and this tutorial demonstrates step-by-step how to keep those insides pretty!

How to Hem an Inverted Pleat

Have fun, and happy sewing!

 

Advertisements

Posted by

I'm a designer/patternmaker who loves to share my sewing knowledge with others! Follow me as I sew my personal projects, sharing my favourite tricks of the trade along the way.

7 thoughts on “5 Sewing Tips for April

  1. YES to the placket on the straight grain. Saves sanity every time, and looks soooo much nicer than the bias ones, which are fiendishly impossible to get perfect. 😀

    Like

Have your say!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s